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Title: Heterogeneous Oxidation of Atmospheric Organic Aerosol: Kinetics of Changes to the Amount and Oxidation State of Particle-Phase Organic Carbon
Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10012116
Journal Name:
The Journal of Physical Chemistry A
Volume:
119
Issue:
44
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
10767 to 10783
ISSN:
1089-5639
Publisher:
American Chemical Society
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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