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Title: Micropolar effect on the cataclastic flow and brittle-ductile transition in high-porosity rocks: MICROPOLAR BRITTLE-DUCTILE TRANSITION
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
1462760 1520732 1516300
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10017275
Journal Name:
Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth
Volume:
121
Issue:
3
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1425 to 1440
ISSN:
2169-9313
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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