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Title: Comments on “Nonlinear Response of a Tropical Cyclone Vortex to Prescribed Eyewall Heating with and without Surface Friction in TCM4: Implications for Tropical Cyclone Intensification”
NSF-PAR ID:
10021567
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  
Publisher / Repository:
DOI PREFIX: 10.1175
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences
Volume:
73
Issue:
12
ISSN:
0022-4928
Page Range / eLocation ID:
5101 to 5103
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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