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Title: Modeling sediment mobilization using a distributed hydrological model coupled with a bank stability model: MODELING SEDIMENT MOBILI
NSF-PAR ID:
10023778
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Water Resources Research
Volume:
53
Issue:
3
ISSN:
0043-1397
Page Range / eLocation ID:
2051 to 2073
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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