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Title: Connecting the Tropics to Polar Regions
Workshop on Connecting the Tropics to the Polar Regions; New York, New York, 2–3 June 2014
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
0902363
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10027934
Journal Name:
Eos
Volume:
96
ISSN:
2324-9250
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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