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Title: Evaluation of deep convective transport in storms from different convective regimes during the DC3 field campaign using WRF-Chem with lightning data assimilation: Convective Transport in DC3 Storms
NSF-PAR ID:
10030645
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres
Volume:
122
Issue:
13
ISSN:
2169-897X
Page Range / eLocation ID:
7140 to 7163
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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