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Title: What is (or should be) scientific evidence use in k‐12 classrooms?
Abstract   more » « less
NSF-PAR ID:
10030773
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  
Publisher / Repository:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Journal of Research in Science Teaching
Volume:
54
Issue:
5
ISSN:
0022-4308
Format(s):
Medium: X Size: p. 672-689
Size(s):
["p. 672-689"]
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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