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Title: Large-scale experimental observations of sheet flow on a sandbar under skewed-asymmetric waves: WAVE-INDUCED SHEET FLOW ON SANDBAR
NSF-PAR ID:
10031715
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
DOI PREFIX: 10.1029
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans
Volume:
122
Issue:
6
ISSN:
2169-9275
Page Range / eLocation ID:
5022 to 5045
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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