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Title: Influence of ion outflow in coupled geospace simulations: 1. Physics-based ion outflow model development and sensitivity study: PHYSICS-BASED ION OUTFLOW
NSF-PAR ID:
10032468
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics
Volume:
121
Issue:
10
ISSN:
2169-9380
Page Range / eLocation ID:
9671 to 9687
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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