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Title: Multidecadal trends in aerosol radiative forcing over the Arctic: Contribution of changes in anthropogenic aerosol to Arctic warming since 1980: The 1980-2010 Trends in Arctic Aerosol RF
Authors:
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Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10034017
Journal Name:
Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres
ISSN:
2169-897X
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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