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Title: Ephemeral and intermittent runoff generation processes in a low relief, highly weathered catchment: TEMPORARY RUNOFF GENERATION PROCESSES
NSF-PAR ID:
10038498
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  
Publisher / Repository:
DOI PREFIX: 10.1029
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Water Resources Research
Volume:
53
Issue:
8
ISSN:
0043-1397
Page Range / eLocation ID:
7055 to 7077
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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