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Title: Place-based and data-rich citizen science as a precursor for conservation action: Citizen Science and Conservation Action
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
1322820
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10042629
Journal Name:
Conservation Biology
Volume:
30
Issue:
3
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
476 to 486
ISSN:
0888-8892
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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