skip to main content

Attention:

The NSF Public Access Repository (NSF-PAR) system and access will be unavailable from 5:00 PM ET until 11:00 PM ET on Friday, June 21 due to maintenance. We apologize for the inconvenience.


Title: Performance Evaluation of an Automatic GPS Ionospheric Phase Scintillation Detector Using a Machine-Learning Algorithm: Scintillation detection with machine learning
NSF-PAR ID:
10043343
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Navigation
Volume:
64
Issue:
3
ISSN:
0028-1522
Page Range / eLocation ID:
391 to 402
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
More Like this
  1. Abstract

    We examined evolution of Global Positioning System (GPS) scintillation during a substorm in the nightside high latitude ionosphere, using 1‐s phase and amplitude scintillation indices from the Canadian High Arctic Ionospheric Network (CHAIN) network. The traditional 1‐min scintillation indices showed that the phase scintillation was dominant, while the amplitude scintillation was weak. However, the 1‐s amplitude scintillation occurred more often in association with major auroral structures (polar cap arc, growth phase arc, onset arc, poleward expanding arc, poleward boundary intensification, and diffuse aurora) that were detected by the THEMIS all‐sky imagers (ASIs). The 1‐min index missed much of the amplitude fluctuations because they only lasted ∼10 s near a local peak or at the gradients of the auroral structures. The 1‐s phase scintillation was concurrent with the amplitude scintillation but was much weaker than the 1‐min phase scintillation. The frequency spectral analysis showed that the spectral power above ∼1 Hz was diffractive and below ∼1 Hz was refractive. We suggest that the amplitude scintillation in the high‐latitude ionosphere is much more common than previously considered, and that a short time window of the order of 1 s should be used to detect the scintillation. The 1‐min phase scintillation index is largely influenced by refractive effects due to total electron content (TEC) variations, and the spectral power below ∼1 Hz should be removed to identify diffractive scintillation.

     
    more » « less