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Title: Quantum Monte Carlo tunneling from quantum chemistry to quantum annealing
Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10043943
Journal Name:
Physical Review B
Volume:
96
Issue:
13
ISSN:
2469-9950
Publisher:
American Physical Society
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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  2. Abstract

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