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Title: Ekman circulation in the Arctic Ocean: Beyond the Beaufort Gyre: EKMAN CIRCULATION IN THE ARCTIC OCEAN
Authors:
 ;  ;  
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10043978
Journal Name:
Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans
Volume:
122
Issue:
4
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
3358 to 3374
ISSN:
2169-9275
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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