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Title: Interannual and Seasonal Patterns of Carbon Dioxide, Water, and Energy Fluxes From Ecotonal and Thermokarst-Impacted Ecosystems on Carbon-Rich Permafrost Soils in Northeastern Siberia: Siberian CO 2 , Water, and Energy Fluxes
Award ID(s):
1637459 1026843 1636476
NSF-PAR ID:
10044997
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
DOI PREFIX: 10.1029
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences
Volume:
122
Issue:
10
ISSN:
2169-8953
Page Range / eLocation ID:
2651 to 2668
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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