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Title: Florida Current Salinity and Salinity Transport: Mean and Decadal Changes: Florida Current Salinity Transport
NSF-PAR ID:
10045363
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  
Publisher / Repository:
DOI PREFIX: 10.1029
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Geophysical Research Letters
Volume:
44
Issue:
20
ISSN:
0094-8276
Page Range / eLocation ID:
10,495 to 10,503
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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