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Title: Leveraging natural capital to solve the shared education and conservation crisis: Natural Capital, Education, and Conservation
Authors:
 ;  ;  
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10046764
Journal Name:
Conservation Biology
Volume:
32
Issue:
2
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
490 to 492
ISSN:
0888-8892
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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