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Title: The biogeochemical cycling of iron, copper, nickel, cadmium, manganese, cobalt, lead, and scandium in a California Current experimental study: Trace metal cycling in the California Current
NSF-PAR ID:
10047648
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Limnology and Oceanography
Volume:
63
Issue:
S1
ISSN:
0024-3590
Page Range / eLocation ID:
S425 to S447
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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