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Title: Chronic repeated exposure to weather-related stimuli elicits few symptoms of chronic stress in captive molting and non-molting European starlings ( Sturnus vulgaris )
Authors:
 ;  ;  
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10049066
Journal Name:
Journal of Experimental Zoology Part A: Ecological and Integrative Physiology
Volume:
327
Issue:
8
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
493 to 503
ISSN:
2471-5638
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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