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Title: Scaling range sizes to threats for robust predictions of risks to biodiversity: Scaling Range Sizes to Threats
Authors:
 ;  ;  
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10053440
Journal Name:
Conservation Biology
Volume:
32
Issue:
2
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
322 to 332
ISSN:
0888-8892
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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