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Title: Reduced phase noise in an erbium frequency comb via intensity noise suppression
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1654425
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10054026
Journal Name:
Optics Express
Volume:
25
Issue:
15
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
18175
ISSN:
1094-4087
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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