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Title: Accumulation of Colloidal Particles in Flow Junctions Induced by Fluid Flow and Diffusiophoresis
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1702693
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10055619
Journal Name:
Physical Review X
Volume:
7
Issue:
4
ISSN:
2160-3308
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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