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Title: An Architecture for Simulating Drones in Mixed Reality Games to Explore Future Search and Rescue Scenarios
The proliferation of unmanned aerial systems (i.e., drones) can provide great value to the future of search and rescue. However, with the increase adoption of such systems, issues around hybrid human-drone team coordination and planning will arise. To address these early challenges, we provide insights into the development of testbeds in the form of mixed reality games with simulated drones. This research presents an architecture to address challenges and opportunities in using drones for search and rescue. On this architecture, we develop a mixed reality game in which human players engage with the physical world and with gameplay that is purely virtual. We expect the architecture to be useful to a range of researchers an practitioners, forming the basis for investigating and training within this unique, new domain.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1651532 1619273
NSF-PAR ID:
10061144
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the ... International ISCRAM Conference
ISSN:
2411-3387
Page Range / eLocation ID:
971-982
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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