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Title: Size-Dependent Relationships between Protein Stability and Thermal Unfolding Temperature Have Important Implications for Analysis of Protein Energetics and High-Throughput Assays of Protein–Ligand Interactions
Award ID(s):
1330259
NSF-PAR ID:
10061208
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
The Journal of Physical Chemistry B
Volume:
122
Issue:
21
ISSN:
1520-6106
Page Range / eLocation ID:
5278 to 5285
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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    This article was corrected on 18 July 2022. See the end of the full text for details.

    Basic Protocol 1: Labeling a protein of interest at its N‐terminus with NHS esters through stepwise reaction

    Alternate Protocol: Labeling a protein of interest at its N‐terminus with NHS esters through a one‐pot reaction

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    Basic Protocol 3: Using MST to determine the binding affinity of an N‐terminal fluorescent‐labeled protein to a binding partner.

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