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Title: Thinking in PolAR pictures: Using rotation-friendly mental images to solve Leiter-R Form Completion
The Leiter International Performance Scale-Revised (Leiter-R) is a standardized cognitive test that seeks to "provide a nonverbal measure of general intelligence by sampling a wide variety of functions from memory to nonverbal reasoning." Understanding the computational building blocks of nonverbal cognition, as measured by the Leiter-R, is an important step towards understanding human nonverbal cognition, especially with respect to typical and atypical trajectories of child development. One subtest of the Leiter-R, Form Completion, involves synthesizing and localizing a visual figure from its constituent slices. Form Completion poses an interesting nonverbal problem that seems to combine several aspects of visual memory, mental rotation, and visual search. We describe a new computational cognitive model that addresses Form Completion using a novel, mental-rotation-friendly image representation that we call the Polar Augmented Resolution (PolAR) Picture, which enables high-fidelity mental rotation operations. We present preliminary results using actual Leiter-R test items and discuss directions for future work.
Authors:
;
Award ID(s):
1730044
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10066318
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the ... AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
612-619
ISSN:
2374-3468
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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