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Title: Controlled self-sorting in self-assembled cage complexes
In this frontier article we highlight recent advances in subcomponent self-sorting in self-assembled metal–ligand cage complexes, with a focus on selective discrimination between ligands that contain highly similar metal-coordinating groups. Effects such as varying ligand length, coordination angle and backbone flexibility, as well as the introduction of secondary weak forces such as hydrogen bonds can be exploited to favor either narcissistic or social self-sorting. We highlight these creative solutions, and emphasize the challenges that remain in the development of functional self-assembled heterocomplexes.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1708019
NSF-PAR ID:
10067374
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Dalton Transactions
Volume:
46
Issue:
43
ISSN:
1477-9226
Page Range / eLocation ID:
14719 to 14723
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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