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Title: WiFi-Enabled Smart Human Dynamics Monitoring
The rapid pace of urbanization and socioeconomic development encourage people to spend more time together and therefore monitoring of human dynamics is of great importance, especially for facilities of elder care and involving multiple activities. Traditional approaches are limited due to their high deployment costs and privacy concerns (e.g., camera-based surveillance or sensor-attachment-based solutions). In this work, we propose to provide a fine-grained comprehensive view of human dynamics using existing WiFi infrastructures often available in many indoor venues. Our approach is low-cost and device-free, which does not require any active human participation. Our system aims to provide smart human dynamics monitoring through participant number estimation, human density estimation and walking speed and direction derivation. A semi-supervised learning approach leveraging the non-linear regression model is developed to significantly reduce training efforts and accommodate different monitoring environments. We further derive participant number and density estimation based on the statistical distribution of Channel State Information (CSI) measurements. In addition, people's walking speed and direction are estimated by using a frequency-based mechanism. Extensive experiments over 12 months demonstrate that our system can perform fine-grained effective human dynamic monitoring with over 90% accuracy in estimating participants number, density, and walking speed and direction at various indoor environments.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1717356
NSF-PAR ID:
10072408
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
ACM Conference on Embedded Network Sensor Systems
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1 to 13
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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