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Title: Seasonal similarity in rates of protistan herbivory in fjords along the Western Antarctic Peninsula: Antarctic seasonal protistan herbivory
NSF-PAR ID:
10073503
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  
Publisher / Repository:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Limnology and Oceanography
Volume:
63
Issue:
6
ISSN:
0024-3590
Page Range / eLocation ID:
p. 2858-2876
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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