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Title: Heating of the intergalactic medium by the cosmic microwave background during cosmic dawn
NSF-PAR ID:
10079529
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
American Physical Society
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Physical Review D
Volume:
98
Issue:
10
ISSN:
2470-0010; PRVDAQ
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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