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Title: Machine learning enabled gearbox fault pattern recognition
Fault pattern recognition in complex mechanical systems such as gearbox has always been a great challenge. The performance of a classic fault pattern recognition approach heavily depends on domain expertise and the classifier applied. This paper proposes a deep convolutional neural network-based transfer learning approach that not only entertains adaptive feature extractions, but also requires only a small set of training data. The proposed transfer learning architecture essentially consists of two sequentially connected pieces; first is of a pre-trained deep neural network that serves to extract features automatically, the second piece is a neural network aimed for classification which is to be trained using data collected from gearbox experiment. The proposed approach performs gear fault pattern recognition using raw accelerometer data. The achieved accuracy indicates that the proposed approach is not only sensitive and robust in performance, but also has the potential to be applied to other pattern recognition practices.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1741174
NSF-PAR ID:
10080017
Author(s) / Creator(s):
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Proceedings of 2018 International Symposium on Flexible Automation
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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