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Title: Bringing Real-World Data and Visualizations of Student-Implemented Data Structures into Sophomore CS Courses Using BRIDGES
This workshop introduces participants to the concepts and use of BRIDGES, a software infrastructure for programming assignments in data structures and algorithms courses. BRIDGES provides two key capabilities, (1) easy to use interface to real world datasets spanning social networks, entertainment (movies on IMDB, song lyrics), scientific data (real-time USGIS Earthquake Data), civic issues (crime data), and literature (books); and (2) a visualization of the acquired data can be used in assignments by students to populate their implemented data structures, including the capability to bring out attributes of the dataset. The visualizations are displayed on the BRIDGES website and are easily shared (with family, friends, peers, etc) via a weblink. Workshop attendees will engage in hands-on experience with BRIDGES and multiple datasets and will have the opportunity to discuss how BRIDGES can be used in their own courses, as well as partner with the BRIDGES team.
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
1245841 1726148
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10091593
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the 50th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1235 to 1235
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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