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Title: Older Adults as Makers of Custom Electronics: Iterating on Craftec
Researchers have designed technologies for and with older adults to help them age in place, but there is an opportunity to support older adults in creating customized smart devices for themselves through electronic toolkits. We developed a plan for iterating on Craftec - one of the first electronic toolkits designed for older adults - informed by the results of a participatory design workshop and user evaluation. We focused on supporting older adults to create exemplar artifacts, such as medication adherence systems. We contribute the exemplars and the current plan for components of the Craftec system as a way to support older adults to design technology for themselves.
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
1814725
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10093450
Journal Name:
CHI EA '19 Extended Abstracts of the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1 to 6
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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