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Title: The growing importance of data literacy in life science education
To prepare students for the data‐rich future that undoubtedly lies ahead, it is imperative that STEM educators rise to meet this challenge and promote the development of strong data literacy in our students. The central ideas, suggestions, and conclusions from the discussion at the 2017 Life Discovery - Doing Science Education conference in Norman, Oklahoma, are summarized here to stimulate individual reflection and promote further conversations on data literacy in biology education among colleagues, departments, and programs.
Authors:
;
Award ID(s):
1742980
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10095978
Journal Name:
American journal of botany
Volume:
105
Issue:
12
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1953-1956
ISSN:
1537-2197
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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