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Title: B 31 and B 32 : chiral quasi-planar boron clusters
Chirality plays an important role in nature. Nanoclusters can also exhibit chiral properties. We report herein a joint experimental and theoretical investigation on the geometric and electronic structures of B 31 − and B 32 − clusters, using photoelectron spectroscopy in combination with first-principles calculations. Two degenerate quasi-planar chiral C 1 enantiomers ( I and II , 1 A) with a central hexagonal vacancy are identified as the global minima of B 31 − . For B 32 − , two degenerate boat-like quasi-planar chiral C 2 structures ( VI and VII , 2 A) with a central hexagonal vacancy are also found as the global minima, with a low-lying chair-like C i B 32 − ( VIII , 2 A u ) also present in the experiment as a minor isomer. The chiral conversions in quasi-planar B 31 − and B 32 − clusters are investigated and relatively low barriers are found due to the high flexibility of these monolayer clusters, which feature multiple delocalized σ and π bonds over buckled molecular surfaces.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1763380
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10096581
Journal Name:
Nanoscale
Volume:
11
Issue:
19
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
9698 to 9704
ISSN:
2040-3364
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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Fig. 3(b) shows the tunneling probability T according to the Kane two-band model in the three materials, In0.53Ga0.47As, GaAs, and GaN, following our observation of a similar electroluminescence mechanism in GaN/AlN RTDs (due to strong polarization field of wurtzite structures) [8]. The expression is Tinter = (2/9)∙exp[(-2 ∙Ug 2 ∙me)/(2h∙P∙E)], where Ug is the bandgap energy, P is the valence-to-conduction-band momentum matrix element, and E is the electric field. Values for the highest calculated internal E fields for the InGaAs and GaN are also shown, indicating that Tinter in those structures approaches values of ~10-5. As shown, a GaAs RTD would require an internal field of ~6×105 V/cm, which is rarely realized in standard GaAs RTDs, perhaps explaining why there have been few if any reports of room-temperature electroluminescence in the GaAs devices. [1] E.R. Brown,et al., Appl. Phys. Lett., vol. 58, 2291, 1991. [5] S. Sze, Physics of Semiconductor Devices, 2nd Ed. 12.2.1 (Wiley, 1981). [2] M. Feiginov et al., Appl. Phys. Lett., 99, 233506, 2011. [6] L. Coldren, Diode Lasers and Photonic Integrated Circuits, (Wiley, 1995). [3] Y. Nishida et al., Nature Sci. Reports, 9, 18125, 2019. [7] E.O. Kane, J. of Appl. Phy 32, 83 (1961). [4] P. Fakhimi, et al., 2019 DRC Conference Digest. [8] T. Growden, et al., Nature Light: Science & Applications 7, 17150 (2018). [5] S. Sze, Physics of Semiconductor Devices, 2nd Ed. 12.2.1 (Wiley, 1981). [6] L. Coldren, Diode Lasers and Photonic Integrated Circuits, (Wiley, 1995). [7] E.O. Kane, J. of Appl. Phy 32, 83 (1961). [8] T. Growden, et al., Nature Light: Science & Applications 7, 17150 (2018).« less