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Title: Mapping in the Wild: Toward Designing to Train Search & Rescue Planning
Search and rescue (SAR), performed to locate and save victims in disaster and other scenarios, primarily involves collaborative sensemaking and planning. To become a SAR responder, students learn to search within and navigate the environment, make sense of situations, and collaboratively plan operations. In this study, we synthesize data from four sources: (1) semi-structured interviews with experienced SAR professionals; (2) online surveys of SAR professionals; (3) analysis of documentation and artifacts from SAR operations on the 2017 hurricanes Harvey and Maria; and (4) first-person experience undertaking SAR training. Drawing on activity theory, we develop an understanding of current SAR sensemaking and planning activities, which help explore unforeseen factors that are relevant to the design of training systems. We derive initial design implications for systems that teach SAR responders to deal with mapping in the outdoors, collecting data, sharing information, and collaboratively planning activities.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1651532 1619273
NSF-PAR ID:
10103941
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Companion of the 2018 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing (CSCW '18)
Page Range / eLocation ID:
137 to 140
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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