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Title: Designing crystalline, flexible covalent metal–organic networks through controlled ligand deprotection
A strategy to generate crystalline coordination polymers with strong, covalent metal-linker bonds is presented. 1,6-Pyrenedi(2-ethylhexylmercaptopropionate) ( 1 ) is converted to 1,6-pyrenedithiolate (PDT) via a base-mediated deprotection allowing for rate control of the metal-linker self assembly. This leads to the formation of a single-crystalline, flexible 2D coordination polymer, [Cd(PDT) 2 ][Cd(en) 3 ] ( 3 ).
Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1726239
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10105640
Journal Name:
CrystEngComm
Volume:
21
Issue:
29
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
4255 to 4257
ISSN:
1466-8033
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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