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Title: Centring Fish Agency in Coastal Dam Removal and River Restoration
This article considers the agentic capacity of fish in dam removal decisions. Pairing new materialist explorations of agency with news media, policy documents, and interviews related to a suite of dam decisions in a New England, USA watershed, we identify the ways that river herring seem constrained through technocratic discourse to particular human-defined roles in dam removal discussions. We suggest, meanwhile, that existing human relationships with salmonids like brook trout might serve as a bridge for public stakeholders and restoration managers to recognise the agentic creativity of fish in dam removal and river restoration decisions.
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
1539071
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10108386
Journal Name:
Water alternatives
Volume:
10
Issue:
3
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
724-743
ISSN:
1965-0175
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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