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Title: DEEPCON: protein contact prediction using dilated convolutional neural networks with dropout
Abstract Motivation

Exciting new opportunities have arisen to solve the protein contact prediction problem from the progress in neural networks and the availability of a large number of homologous sequences through high-throughput sequencing. In this work, we study how deep convolutional neural networks (ConvNets) may be best designed and developed to solve this long-standing problem.

Results

With publicly available datasets, we designed and trained various ConvNet architectures. We tested several recent deep learning techniques including wide residual networks, dropouts and dilated convolutions. We studied the improvements in the precision of medium-range and long-range contacts, and compared the performance of our best architectures with the ones used in existing state-of-the-art methods. The proposed ConvNet architectures predict contacts with significantly more precision than the architectures used in several state-of-the-art methods. When trained using the DeepCov dataset consisting of 3456 proteins and tested on PSICOV dataset of 150 proteins, our architectures achieve up to 15% higher precision when L/2 long-range contacts are evaluated. Similarly, when trained using the DNCON2 dataset consisting of 1426 proteins and tested on 84 protein domains in the CASP12 dataset, our single network achieves 4.8% higher precision than the ensembled DNCON2 method when top L long-range contacts are evaluated.

Availability and implementation

DEEPCON is available at https://github.com/badriadhikari/DEEPCON/.

 
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NSF-PAR ID:
10115199
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;
Publisher / Repository:
Oxford University Press
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Bioinformatics
ISSN:
1367-4803
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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