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Title: Linking Teacher–Learner Discourse With Mathematical Reasoning of Students With Learning Disabilities: An Exploratory Study

Informed by a constructivist-based, student-adaptive pedagogical approach, this study explores the benefits of teacher–learner discourse moves for the mathematics learning of students with learning disabilities (LD). During a constructivist teaching experiment for nurturing the multiplicative reasoning and problem solving of five third-grade students with school-identified LD, we analyzed the global trends and detailed dynamics of teacher–student interactions with statistical discourse analysis. We found that the teacher’s discourse moves to support each individual student’s problem solving helped engage them in mathematical reasoning, which improved their problem-solving performance. Thus, this study contributes to knowledge in the field of special education by (a) specifying ways in which discourse-oriented mathematics instruction can help each student with LD and (b) showcasing a novel statistical analysis of teacher–student discourse.

 
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NSF-PAR ID:
10115796
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
SAGE Publications
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Learning Disability Quarterly
Volume:
43
Issue:
1
ISSN:
0731-9487
Page Range / eLocation ID:
p. 43-56
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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