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Title: Enabling rich data sharing for Science Gateways via the SeedMeLab platform
Abstract Science Gateways provide an easily accessible and powerful computing environment for researchers. These are built around a set of software tools that are frequently and heavily used by large number of researchers in specific domains. Science Gateways have been catering to a growing need of researchers for easy to use computational tools, however their usage model is typically single user-centric. As scientific research becomes ever more team oriented, the need driven by user-demand to support integrated collaborative capabilities in Science Gateways is natural progression. Ability to share data/results with others in an integrated manner is an important and frequently requested capability. In this article we will describe and discuss our work to provide a rich environment for data organization and data sharing by integrating the SeedMeLab (formerly SeedMe2) platform with two Science Gateways: CIPRES and GenApp. With this integration we also demonstrate SeedMeLab’s extensible features and how Science Gateways may incorporate and realize FAIR data principles in practice and transform into community data hubs.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1912444 1740097 1265817
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10116255
Journal Name:
Proceedings of Gateways 2019
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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