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Title: WFIRST: Enhancing Transient Science and Multi-Messenger Astronomy
Ground-based observatories will discover thousands of transients in the optical, but will not provide the NIR photometry and high-resolution imaging of a space-based observatory. WFIRST can fill this gap. With its SN Ia survey, WFIRST will also discover thousands of other transients in the NIR, revealing the physics for these high-energy events.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1817099
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10120209
Journal Name:
Baas
ISSN:
2468-1083
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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