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Title: The Milky Way’s halo and subhaloes in self-interacting dark matter
ABSTRACT

We perform high-resolution simulations of an MW-like galaxy in a self-interacting cold dark matter model with elastic cross-section over mass of $1~\rm cm^2\, g^{-1}$ (SIDM) and compare to a model without self-interactions (CDM). We run our simulations with and without a time-dependent embedded potential to capture effects of the baryonic disc and bulge contributions. The CDM and SIDM simulations with the embedded baryonic potential exhibit remarkably similar host halo profiles, subhalo abundances, and radial distributions within the virial radius. The SIDM host halo is denser in the centre than the CDM host and has no discernible core, in sharp contrast to the case without the baryonic potential (core size ${\sim}7 \, \rm kpc$). The most massive subhaloes (with $V_{\mathrm{peak}}\gt 20 \, \rm km\, s^{-1}$) in our SIDM simulations, expected to host the classical satellite galaxies, have density profiles that are less dense than their CDM analogues at radii less than 500 pc but the deviation diminishes for less massive subhaloes. With the baryonic potential included in the CDM and SIDM simulations, the most massive subhaloes do not display the too-big-to-fail problem. However, the least dense among the massive subhaloes in both these simulations tend to have the smallest pericenter values, a trend that is not apparent among the bright MW satellite galaxies.

 
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NSF-PAR ID:
10121811
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
Oxford University Press
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Volume:
490
Issue:
2
ISSN:
0035-8711
Page Range / eLocation ID:
p. 2117-2123
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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