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Title: Observation of Rydberg exciton polaritons and their condensate in a perovskite cavity
The condensation of half-light half-matter exciton polaritons in semiconductor optical cavities is a striking example of macroscopic quantum coherence in a solid-state platform. Quantum coherence is possible only when there are strong interactions between the exciton polaritons provided by their excitonic constituents. Rydberg excitons with high principal value exhibit strong dipole–dipole interactions in cold atoms. However, polaritons with the excitonic constituent that is an excited state, namely Rydberg exciton polaritons (REPs), have not yet been experimentally observed. Here, we observe the formation of REPs in a single crystal CsPbBr 3 perovskite cavity without any external fields. These polaritons exhibit strong nonlinear behavior that leads to a coherent polariton condensate with a prominent blue shift. Furthermore, the REPs in CsPbBr 3 are highly anisotropic and have a large extinction ratio, arising from the perovskite’s orthorhombic crystal structure. Our observation not only sheds light on the importance of many-body physics in coherent polariton systems involving higher-order excited states, but also paves the way for exploring these coherent interactions for solid-state quantum optical information processing.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1725335
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10124610
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Volume:
116
Issue:
41
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
20274 to 20279
ISSN:
0027-8424
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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