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Title: Using population receptive field models to elucidate spatial integration in high-level visual cortex
While spatial information and biases have been consistently reported in high-level face regions, the functional contribution of this information toward face recognition behavior is unclear. Here, we propose that spatial integration of information plays a critical role in a hallmark phenomenon of face perception: holistic processing, or the tendency to process all features of a face concurrently rather than independently. We sought to gain insight into the neural basis of face recognition behavior by using a voxelwise encoding model of spatial selectivity to characterize the human face network using both typical face stimuli, and stimuli thought to disrupt normal face perception. We mapped population receptive fields (pRFs) using 3T fMRI in 6 participants using upright as well as inverted faces, which are thought to disrupt holistic processing. Compared to upright faces, inverted faces yielded substantial differences in measured pRF size, position, and amplitude. Further, these differences increased in magnitude along the face network hierarchy, from IOG- to pFus- and mFus-faces. These data suggest that pRFs in high-level regions reflect complex stimulus- dependent neural computations that underlie variations in recognition performance.
Authors:
Award ID(s):
1756035
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10126992
Journal Name:
2019 Conference on Cognitive Computational Neuroscience, 13-16 September 2019, Berlin, Germany
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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