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Title: Simultaneous Millimetre-wave and X-ray monitoring of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 7469
ABSTRACT

We report on daily monitoring of the Seyfert galaxy ngc 7469, around 95 and 143 GHz, with the iram (Institut de Radioastronomie Millimetrique) 30- m radio telescope, and with the Swift X-ray and UV/optical telescopes, over an overlapping period of 45 d. The source was observed on 36 d with iram, and the flux density in both mm bands was on average ∼10 mJy, but varied by $\pm 50{{\ \rm per\ cent}}$, and by up to a factor of 2 between days. The present iram variability parameters are consistent with earlier monitoring, which had only 18 data points. The X-ray light curve of ngc 7469 over the same period spans a factor of 5 in flux with small uncertainties. Similar variability in the mm band and in the X-rays lends support to the notion of both sources originating in the same physical component of the active galactic nucleus (AGN), likely the accretion disc corona. Simultaneous monitoring in eight UV/optical bands shows much less variability than the mm and X-rays, implying this light originates from a different AGN component, likely the accretion disc itself. We use a tentative 14-d lag of the X-ray light curve with respect to the 95 GHz light curve to speculate on coronal implications. More more » precise mm-band measurements of a sample of X-ray-variable AGN are needed, preferably also on time-scales of less than a day where X-rays vary dramatically, in order to properly test the physical connection between the two bands.

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Authors:
 ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10127149
Journal Name:
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Volume:
491
Issue:
3
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
p. 3523-3534
ISSN:
0035-8711
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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