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Title: Negative Charge as a Lens for Concentrating Antiaromaticity: Using a Pentagonal “Defect” and Helicene Strain for Cyclizations
Abstract

Incorporation of a five‐membered ring into a helicene framework disrupts aromatic conjugation and provides a site for selective deprotonation. The deprotonation creates an anionic cyclopentadienyl unit, switches on conjugation, leads to a >200 nm red‐shift in the absorbance spectrum and injects a charge into a helical conjugated π‐system without injecting a spin. Structural consequences of deprotonation were revealed via analysis of a monoanionic helicene co‐crystallized with {K+(18‐crown‐6)(THF)} and {Cs+2(18‐crown‐6)3}. UV/Vis‐monitoring of these systems shows a time‐dependent formation of mono‐ and dianionic species, and the latter was isolated and crystallographically characterized. The ability of the twisted helicene frame to delocalize the negative charge was probed as a perturbation of aromaticity using NICS scans. Relief of strain, avoidance of antiaromaticity, and increase in charge delocalization assist in the additional dehydrogenative ring closures that yield a new planarized decacyclic dianion.

 
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NSF-PAR ID:
10127284
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Angewandte Chemie
Volume:
132
Issue:
3
ISSN:
0044-8249
Page Range / eLocation ID:
p. 1272-1278
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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