skip to main content


Title: 3D Printing of Electrochemical Energy Storage Devices: A Review of Printing Techniques and Electrode/Electrolyte Architectures
Award ID(s):
1805938 1809439
NSF-PAR ID:
10130202
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Batteries & Supercaps
Volume:
3
Issue:
2
ISSN:
2566-6223
Page Range / eLocation ID:
p. 130-146
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
More Like this
  1. Abstract

    Melt electrowriting (MEW), an emergent additive manufacturing process, shows significant potential in fabricating high‐fidelity fibrous scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. However, fiber deviation can deteriorate the printing accuracy of MEW. To evaluate the printing accuracy, an evaluation protocol along with an index (Ip) is proposed. For the first time, 0–90 patterned and 0–θpatterned scaffolds with varying inter‐fiber distances along different printing directions are fabricated to establish the dependence ofIpon two distinct printing sequences. One sequence is the small–large sequence, which first prints the fibers separated by a small inter‐fiber distance, followed by fibers separated by a large inter‐fiber distance. Alternatively, for the large–small sequence, the fibers separated by a large inter‐fiber distance are printed prior to the fibers separated by a small inter‐fiber distance. The small–large sequence contributes to largerIpresults compared to the large–small sequence. Moreover, the printing sequence has more significant effects on theIpfor the 0–θpattern compared to the 0–90 pattern. These differences can be attributed to different fiber morphologies at the intersection points, accompanied by resultantly varying charge amounts, which gives an insight into the cause of fiber deviation phenomena.

     
    more » « less
  2. The report involves the application and testing of dynamics concepts through the use of 3D-printed components. It includes various challenges promoting innovation and critical thinking. Challenge 1 focused on exploring angular motion through the design of a 3D-printed wheel. In Challenge 2, a shake table was developed by creating a reciprocating mechanism that converted rotational-to-linear motion. The kinematic relations of the 3D model were derived from the geometry of the mechanism to meet a targeted acceleration. Challenge 3 applied structural dynamics concepts by designing columns of a structure to meet a natural frequency. Challenge 4 built upon previous challenges to test a structure and shake table under forced vibrations. The results from the experiment were used to analyze the dynamic response of a structural system. The challenges integrated 3D design and mathematical modeling to understand the importance of dynamic behaviors in structural engineering.The 3D-printing Dynamics Design (3D3) Competition intends to train School of Civil Engineering & Environmental Science (CEES) undergraduates at the University of Oklahoma in fundamental concepts related to vibrations, structural dynamics, and earthquake engineering through a semester-long, hands-on competition run in parallel with Introduction to Dynamics for Architectural and Civil Engineers (CEES 3263). Competition participants, or 3D3 Scholars, design, build, and test a bench-scale shake table using 3D-printed components. The designs of these shake tables are published here, along with all the STL files needed for teachers or students elsewhere to fabricate the tables. Also, the data collected during the challenges is published. 
    more » « less
  3. This report will explore concepts regarding structural dynamics through the utilization of a 3-D printed structure. The report has been broken into 4 challenges, each with its own concept being investigated. Within Challenge 1, a wheel was designed and printed to generate the lowest possible angular acceleration while gathering examining the theory behind rotational motion. Challenge 2 explored cyclical motion as this is where the shake table was designed and constructed. This challenge allowed for an understanding of how ground motion can be generated under a structure. Challenge 3 consisted of free vibration tests through the design of columns with a targeted natural frequency. Challenge 4 compounded off of Challenge 2 and Challenge 3 when the structure was subjected to forced, cyclical motion, from the shake table in order to explore concepts such as displacement and transmissibility generated from a structure subjected to forced vibration.The 3D-printing Dynamics Design (3D3) Competition intends to train School of Civil Engineering & Environmental Science (CEES) undergraduates at the University of Oklahoma in fundamental concepts related to vibrations, structural dynamics, and earthquake engineering through a semester-long, hands-on competition run in parallel with Introduction to Dynamics for Architectural and Civil Engineers (CEES 3263). Competition participants, or 3D3 Scholars, design, build, and test a bench-scale shake table using 3D-printed components. The designs of these shake tables are published here, along with all the STL files needed for teachers or students elsewhere to fabricate the tables. Also, the data collected during the challenges is published. 
    more » « less
  4. The goal of this project is to gain a better understanding of the importance of structural integrity and how structures behave under motion. This report intends to investigate and analyze structural dynamics’ concepts with 3-D printed components in four unique challenges. Challenge 1 explores angular acceleration and rotational dynamics through a 3-D printed wheel. Challenge 2 focuses on reciprocating motion by designing and assembling a mechanism that is connected to a 3-D printed shake table. Challenge 3 involves creating structural columns which are assembled in a single-story structure. It also dives into concepts such as the natural frequency of a structure and how elements of design will influence it. Challenge 4 incorporates both Challenges 2 and 3 by shaking the single-story structure through the reciprocating motion mechanism. It also looks at important structural dynamics’ concepts such as transmissibility and resonance.The 3D-printing Dynamics Design (3D3) Competition intends to train School of Civil Engineering & Environmental Science (CEES) undergraduates at the University of Oklahoma in fundamental concepts related to vibrations, structural dynamics, and earthquake engineering through a semester-long, hands-on competition run in parallel with Introduction to Dynamics for Architectural and Civil Engineers (CEES 3263). Competition participants, or 3D3 Scholars, design, build, and test a bench-scale shake table using 3D-printed components. The designs of these shake tables are published here, along with all the STL files needed for teachers or students elsewhere to fabricate the tables. Also, the data collected during the challenges is published. 
    more » « less