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Title: Evaluating Methods for End-User Creation of Robot Task Plans
How can we enable users to create effective, perception-driven task plans for collaborative robots? We conducted a 35-person user study with the Behavior Tree-based CoSTAR system to determine which strategies for end user creation of generalizable robot task plans are most usable and effective. CoSTAR allows domain experts to author complex, perceptually grounded task plans for collaborative robots. As a part of CoSTAR's wide range of capabilities, it allows users to specify SmartMoves: abstract goals such as "pick up component A from the right side of the table." Users were asked to perform pick-and-place assembly tasks with either SmartMoves or one of three simpler baseline versions of CoSTAR. Overall, participants found CoSTAR to be highly usable, with an average System Usability Scale score of 73.4 out of 100. SmartMove also helped users perform tasks faster and more effectively; all SmartMove users completed the first two tasks, while not all users completed the tasks using the other strategies. SmartMove users showed better performance for incorporating perception across all three tasks.
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1637949
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10136844
Journal Name:
2018 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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