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Title: Assessing Cellular Metabolism Using 2-Photon Imaging And Cancer Spheroids
Introduction: Spheroids show great promise in being a better model for testing treatments for cancer in vitro when compared to monolayer cells. Single photon imaging of spheroids is limited by depth. Due to this reason, two photon imaging is necessary to obtain a full image of the spheroid. We developed a software that can evaluate the cellular metabolism of a spheroid by calculating the Redox Index (NADH divided by FAD). We tried to validate this software by treating the spheroids with an ATP antagonist.
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1757885
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10138563
Journal Name:
2019 BMES Conference Proceedings - REU Abstract Accepted Poster
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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